Illinois Author Project

LaCost paperback

A while back I entered an Illinois author project sponsored by the Soon To Be Famous website. It was a contest for works of fiction aimed at adult readers. The contest was for the state of Illinois, and entries had to be sponsored by their local libraries. The books were judged by a select group of librarians. The semifinalists were recently announced.

I am proud and humbled to say that Lacost is in the semifinals.

You can go to the Soon To Be Famous website to check out the contest. There are a lot of good books there!

Where will LaCost show up next?

The Einstein house

Sitting behind Einstein’s desk

On a recent trip to Bern, Switzerland, I got the chance to fulfill every science/physics geek’s dream. I was able to sit for a moment behind the ¬†desk that Einstein worked at when he was a grade 3 clerk at the Bern patent office. This was the very desk that he used when working on his Theory of Special Relativity.

The desk is now at the Einstein Museum in Bern. The museum is actually the apartment where Albert and his first wife, Mileva Meric Einstein, lived from 1903 to 1905. It had 60,000 visitors last year. It is closed in January. We, (myself and close family members), visited Bern in, of course, January. If not for the good graces of Mr. Jurg Rub, the museum curator, I wouldn’t have been able to see the place. He was gracious, very helpful and remarkably knowledgeable. All in all, a most terrific guy. Don’t know how I got so lucky. I guess sometimes the physics gods smile upon us.

Touring the Einstein Museum with curator Jurg Rub
The street in front of Einstein’s apartment where he walked to work at the patent office from 1903 to 1905

As every history buff knows, seeing actual objects from earlier times somehow seems to make that time more real, cements it a little tighter in one’s head. For this author, seeing where Einstein lived when he first worked on Relativity – sitting behind his desk was, well, quite extraordinary to say the least.

WHERE WILL LACOST SHOW UP NEXT?

 

 

Gutenberg and the new year

LaCost at the Gutenberg museum, Mainz, Germany.

Johannes Gutenberg, as we all know, invented mechanical movable type, aka the printing press. His invention is one of the watershed moments in human development, every bit as significant as fire, the wheel, and computers. Without the printing press our advances in science and technology would have continued to stagnate. The Renaissance itself may well never have happened. Dissemination of information increases knowledge exponentially. 

It’s been said that the destruction of the Library of Alexandria set us back such that we could have gone to the moon 100 years sooner. Exaggeration, possibly? I would submit that without Gutenberg’s invention we might still be using horses and buggies, instead of unlocking the mysteries of time and space itself. As we usher in the new year it seems proper to remember how Mr. Gutenberg ushered in a new era for us.

Where will LaCost show up next?

Holiday gifts

Ebooks
Ebook devices

With the holidays coming deciding on gifts can be, well, a bit of a pain. Books are easy and always a good choice.

Just a reminder that LaCost-The Evolution of Jason – ebook, is available at Amazon, patrickrizio.com or touchwoodpress.com for only $2.99. Click on the ebook tab and an app that allows you to read it on any kindle or other e-reader, pad, computer, or smartphone is free.

LaCost paperback

For anyone who prefers a regular book, the paperback version of LaCost is available at touchwoodpress.com for a 25% discount.

Again, I would like to thank everyone who has taken an interest in LaCost. The feedback and encouragement have been more than I could have hoped for.

Here’s hoping the holidays are an absolutely terrific time for us all!

Author day

Patrick Rizio with LaCost at Indie Author day-Schaumburg Library

October 14th, Indie Author day, Schaumburg Library. What a blast!

Had the chance to “compare notes” with other authors, and talk with readers of all ages. It was a dark and rainy day, but that didn’t seem to dampen anyone’s spirits. I cannot thank the Schaumburg Library enough for putting on this event. Well done! Can’t wait for next year.

Where will LaCost show up next?